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Teen Girl, Baby Boy Found Dead In Irving Home

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(credit: Larry W. Smith/Getty Images)

(credit: Larry W. Smith/Getty Images)

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IRVING (CBSDFW.COM/AP) – Irving police are investigating the deaths of a 15-year-old girl and a month-old boy after a 911 call about a body in a house.

Thursday morning investigators determined that the teen girl is in fact the mother of the baby.

Police are not releasing details on how the pair died, but the Dallas County Medical Examiner’s Office has confirmed the deaths of 15-year-old Rebecca Ray and four-week-old Cole Childress.

An autopsy done Thursday, on both Ray and her child, found no injuries or trauma. Toxicology tests have been ordered, but detectives say it could be several months before they are completed. The family’s pastor said, according to the family, Ray had was sitting on her bed feeding her child when something caused her to fall backward, unconscious. The pastor said the family told him the child was under Ray.

The family declined to comment at this time. Though, Irving Police said they were researching Ray’s medical history to see if a condition could have caused her death.

A police statement says an emergency call Wednesday night was from a person stating that someone appeared to be deceased inside a residence in the 1000 block of Briar Oaks.

Police tell CBS 11 News that both the teen and the baby were found in a bedroom. “It appears that there were no signs of trauma or any signs of injury to either one of them,” explained Irving Public Information Officer John Argumaniz. “[There were] no signs of struggle. Nothing was in disarray to indicate any type of violent action at the residence.”

The mother and child were home alone when a family member arrived at the house, discovered them, and called police.

Officers found Rebecca Ray dead at the scene. Ray was a freshman at the Jack E. Singley Academy in Irving.

“She was a very astute young woman and she knew there were going to be some obstacles for her to overcome,” said Barry Hinkle, who taught Ray in third period. Hinkle said Ray was always bubbly, engaged and smiling at school.

The infant was transported to Baylor Medical Center at Irving, where he was pronounced dead.

(©2010 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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