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Teen Birth Rate At All-Time Low; Economy Cited

A teenager, who is nine months pregnant, poses with her belly before having an ultrasound examination. (credit: Getty Images/Joe Raedle)

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(AP) – The U.S. teen birth rate hit an all-time low in 2009 — a decline that stunned experts say is partly because of the economy.

The birth rate for teenagers fell to 39 births per 1,000 girls, ages 15 through 19, according to a government report released Tuesday. It was a 6 percent decline from the previous year, and the lowest rate since health officials started tracking that data in 1940.

Experts say the recent recession — from December 2007 to June 2009 — was a major factor driving down births overall, and experts say there’s good reason to think it affect would-be teen mothers.

“I’m not suggesting that teens are examining futures of (pension funds) or how the market is doing,” said Sarah Brown, chief executive of the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. “But I think they are living in families that experience that stress. They are living next door to families that lost their jobs… The recession has touched us all.”

But there’s reason to rein in celebration of the 2009 numbers. The U.S. teen birth rate continues to be far higher than that of 16 other developed countries, according to a 2007 United Nations comparison that Brown cited. In July a report, conducted by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, listed Texas with the third highest rate of teenage births in the country. That report found that 64 babies are born for every 1,000 girls between the ages of 15 and 19 in Texas.

Still, news of the large decline was a stunning and exciting surprise for advocates, Brown noted. “This is like a Christmas present,” she said.

Teenage moms, who account for about 10 percent of the nation’s births, are not unique. The total number of births also has been dropping, as have birth rates among all women except those 40 and older.

For comparison look to the peak year of teen births — 1957. There were about 96 births per 1,000 teen girls that year, but it was a different era, when women married younger, said Stephanie Ventura, a co-author of the report issued by the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CDC births report is based on a review of most birth certificates for 2009.

Overall, about 4.1 million babies were born in 2009, down almost 3 percent from 2008. It’s the second consecutive annual decline in births, after births had been increasing since 2000.

The trend may continue: A preliminary count of U.S. births through the first six months of this year suggests a continuing drop, CDC officials said.

A decline in immigration to the United States, blamed on the weak job market, is another factor cited for the lower birth rate. A large proportion of immigrants are Hispanic, and Hispanics accounted for nearly 1 in 4 births in 2009. The birth rate among Hispanic teens is the highest of any ethnic group with 70 births per 1,000 girls in 2009. However, that rate, too, was down from the previous year.

Some also believe popular culture also has played an important role among teens. The issue of teen pregnancy got a lot of attention through Bristol Palin, the unmarried pregnant daughter of former Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin. Bristol Palin had a baby boy in December 2008. Teen pregnancy is also cast in a harsh light by “Sixteen and Pregnant,” a popular MTV reality show which first aired in 2009 and chronicles the difficulties teen moms face.

However, the birth rate for women ages 40-44 was up 3 percent from 2008, to about 10 births per 1,000 women. That’s the highest rate for that group since 1967.

(©2010 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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