Local

Arlington ISD Considering Deep Budget Cuts

By Robbie Owens, CBS 11 News
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A third-grade student works on a paper. (credit: Getty Images/Larry W. Smith)

A third-grade student works on a paper. (credit: Getty Images/Larry W. Smith)

Robbie Owens Robbie Owens
Robbie grew up in northeast Texas, in a tiny town where her fami...
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ARLINGTON (CBSDFW.COM) – After officials with the Dallas Independent School District proposed deep budget cuts last week – including reductions to teacher salaries – another North Texas school district is again talking about dramatic ways to lower their spending. The Arlington Independent School District wants to hear from taxpayers about how and where they should cut their budget.

Officials in Arlington are expecting a $35 million drop in state funding. When combined with an existing $13 million deficit, there is $48 million that needs to be erased from school spending.

Superintendent Jerry McCullough and the Arlington ISD school board are considering several options for removing this money from the budget. Teachers with less than three years on the job could face layoffs. In all, roughly 132 teacher positions are expected to be eliminated.

McCullough called the state funding cuts “devastating.” He sent out a message to the community. “There are difficult times in the history of all organizations, and this is one of those times for the AISD and school districts around the state,” McCullough said. “We may be doing business differently in the future than we are right now. But, my staff and I are working to ensure that AISD gets through any future reductions and continues to provide more than a remarkable education for our students.”

According to Arlington school officials, an outside consulting firm has been called to the district to conduct a “cost containment study” that will identify any other possible savings.

Arlington ISD and Dallas ISD are not likely to be the only school districts across the state to consider deep budget cuts. Funding was decreased across the entire state. Public education makes up about 44 percent of the state budget.

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