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Race Begins To Replace Moncrief

By Joel Thomas, CBS 11 News
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Fort Worth Mayor Mike Moncrief laughs after drag racing Texas Motor Speedway President Eddie Gossage down pit lane. (credit: Tom Pennington/Getty Images for the Texas Motor Speedway)

Fort Worth Mayor Mike Moncrief laughs after drag racing Texas Motor Speedway President Eddie Gossage down pit lane. (credit: Tom Pennington/Getty Images for the Texas Motor Speedway)

FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – Three well-known Tarrant County people have filed to run for Fort Worth Mayor to replace Mayor Mike Moncrief when he steps down at the end of his term this year.

“With Mayor Moncrief leaving, a lot of people have only known Mayor Moncrief as mayor, so with him stepping down I think a lot of people will be wondering who can step into his shoes,” said political science professor and analysts Allan Saxe.

Three people have lined up to try to take Mayor Moncrief’s place.

Cathy Hirt, a former council member, already has a campaign headquarters established and, she says, hundreds of volunteers.  Hirt has retired from a career in education and working with school boards.

Well known attorney and former council member Jim Lane brings name recognition and the support of former mayor ken Barr.

And nine-year Tarrant County Tax Assessor Betsy Price is resigning her county post to run for the mayor’s seat.  She’ll stay in office until commissioners appoint a replacement.

“I think what we’re going to see in Fort Worth is a very competitive race,” said Saxe. “Because, again, I don’t think there’s a breakaway candidate right now where you can say that person is way out in front.”

Saxe and other analysts say whoever takes over for Moncrief faces crucial decisions affecting city services, tax rates and the the growth of the city.

Already, federal and state dollars are drying up, even as new population growth puts more demand on roads and services.

That balancing act between new taxes and fees and cutting services, saxe believes, will be crucial to the campaigns.

“They have to deal with huge population changes and huge demographic changes and all that that means… with Mayor Moncrief leaving, a lot of people have only known mayor moncrief as mayor, so with him stepping down I think a lot of people will be wondering who can step into his shoes,” says Saxe.

Saxe and other analysts say whomever takes over for Moncrief faces crucial decisions affecting city services, tax rates and the the growth of the city.

Already, federal and state dollars are drying up, even as new population growth puts more demand on roads and services.

That balancing act between new taxes and fees and cutting services, saxe believes, will be crucial to the campaigns.

“So we know the cities are going to have to start cutting back, they already have,” Saxe said, “With perhaps more to come.”

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