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North Texas Cities Help Residents With West Nile Threat

(credit: KTVT/KTXA) Stephanie Lucero
Stephanie is an Emmy Award winning veteran reporter for CBS 11 N...
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DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) - North Texans are being asked to do their part to rid their yards of mosquito larvae. And to help out, a number of cities are giving residents tools to help fight off the mosquito population.

Carol Seay is not taking the warnings about West Nile virus lightly.

“If there’s a mosquito within 50 miles he will find me,” said Seay.  I have always kept Off and anytime I go out in the summertime I always spray myself so now I’m just taking extra precautions and just spraying myself a little more often.

She is taking University Park up on its offer of free mosquito “dunks.” These dunks may look like donuts, but when they are submerged in standing water they release a bacterium that is toxic to all species of mosquito larvae.

“I think it’s a great idea. I think anything we can do preventative-wise is important,” Seay said.

Cities that are giving these “dunks” are limiting them to their own citizens.  But anyone who wants to buy them, can get dunks at most hardware and home and garden stores.

North Texas cities are also finding other methods to help residents against the West Nile threat.

The City of Dallas has purchased space on this digital billboard near Woodall Rogers Freeway and I-35 downtown to warn people about the dangers of West Nile. Meanwhile, the City of Carrollton has set up a hotline for its residents to ask questions about the virus.

And while Dallas County prepared for enhanced spraying, health officials want all of us to take our own precautions during this health emergency.

“We have to realize that a lot of these mosquitos are breeding in trees, in bushes, so we got to really look at how we’re mosquito-proofing ourselves, our homes and our neighborhoods and that has to be our clear message,” Zachary Thompson, the director of Dallas County Health and Human Services.