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Allergy Sufferers Should Brace For A Rough Season

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NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Right now allergies are a big problem in North Texas. Experts say the mild winter weather and wet summer has opened the door for ragweed and mold.

Allergist, Dr. Gary Gross says a good hard freeze is really the only way to reduce the pollen count.

“The leaves fall off the trees and the plants are not as likely to make pollen, but if we don’t have a hard freeze and if we don’t get rain then the pollen still can float around as soon as we get some wind.”

According to the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital of Dallas physician, ragweed has hit North Texas hard and earlier than usual, wreaking havoc on people who suffer from allergies.

“The pollen counts are higher — they always go up in the fall,” Dr. Gross said. “But also we had that damp weather just before the ragweed hit and so the mold counts have gone up as well.”

Doctors say it doesn’t do much good to tell patients to stay indoors, when the weather is finally enjoyable. But, they also say nagging allergy symptoms shouldn’t be ignored.

“It can start just as a little bit of nasal congestion, drainage down the back of the throat,” the doctor explained. “But, if it goes on for a long period of time, then the mucus starts getting thicker and that has become an area where bacteria can start growing, so you can have secondary sinus infections or other kinds of bacterial infections.”

According to Dr. Gross, over-the-counter medications are safe and effective but if a problem persists it is best to call your doctor.

Even North Texans away from home are having problems. Texas Rangers outfielder Josh Hamilton was taken out of the game in Anaheim, California on Tuesday, because his sinuses were affecting his vision. Doctor Gross said that’s because of the close proximity of the sinuses to the eye.

“If you have a lot of pressure in your sinuses and the bone of the orbit is thin enough then you can transmit some of that pressure to change the configuration to affect your vision,” he explained.

Hamilton was also benched on Wednesday because his sinuses gave him blurry vision. No word yet on whether he’ll play in the final game tonight.

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