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Construction Sector Jobs Increased 9.8% Year Over Year In Dallas

(credit: Thinkstock)

(credit: Thinkstock)

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The United States has run into a few troubled times. As a result, United States citizens are insecure about their future. With foreclosure rates higher than ever before and unemployment drowning the average consumer, Dallas is still managing to stay afloat.

According to United States Department of Labor, as of January 2013, construction may be leading the way for job growth in the wider DFW-area. The number of construction employees within Dallas, grouped with mining and logging positions, has grown by 9.8 percent from January 2012 to January 2013. With the population growth continuing to infiltrate the DFW economy, the need for construction workers is skyrocketing and this is great news for Dallas. A simple search on Monster.com will turn up surprising results for construction opportunities in Dallas. With over 700 job positions listed, eager workers can make their way into the field in multiple areas.

Dallas is not dying from economic dysfunction. We are still alive and well, so kick up your boots and celebrate the fact that Dallas has not fallen. Have you noticed all of the construction in the area these days? Surely as you’re driving to work in the morning or desperately trying to dodge the traffic on the way home, you’ve impatiently tapped your fingers on the steering wheel and noticed that workers are everywhere, trying to improve the flow of our fair city. Someone has to fill these jobs. With expansion as an anticipated inevitability, more and more workers will be needed.

The Dallas Office of Economic Development has an economic development plan with the objective of growth, economic opportunities for residents and stable city revenue. We are on top of our impending saturation. A degree is not necessarily required for some construction jobs, although a degree is always preferred and will allow for upward mobility as stability progresses. This is an opportunity for all who are interested. So don’t lose hope, Dallas. We are still climbing that economic ladder with ease.

Judy Serrano writes romantic thrillers at www.JudySerraon.com. She graduated from Texas A&M Commerce with a BA in English. She is also a freelance writer for Examiner.com. She lives in Texas with her husband, four boys and five dogs.