CBS 11 Header TXA 21 Header MeTV Header KRLD Header The Fan Header
CBS DFW WEATHER APP: iPhone App Store | Android App Coming Soon | More Information

Local

GOP Leaders: Court Erred In Brain-Dead Pregnancy

View Comments
Marlise Munoz (credit: CBS 11 News)

Marlise Munoz (credit: CBS 11 News)

Get Breaking News First

Receive News, Politics, and Entertainment Headlines Each Morning.
Sign Up

From Our CBS Music Web Sites

494849761 10 GOP Leaders: Court Erred In Brain Dead Pregnancy Celebrating National Underwear Day

465887719 GOP Leaders: Court Erred In Brain Dead Pregnancy Facebook Users – Beware The App!

 alt=JLo Shows Off Her Best Assets In New Cover

904255 10 GOP Leaders: Court Erred In Brain Dead Pregnancy Remembering Robin Williams

 alt=Musicians Then And Now

Fantasy_tile

VOTE: Best Coaches In American Sports

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — Four big-name Republicans running for lieutenant governor said Monday night that a Texas judge erred when he ordered a brain-dead, pregnant woman off life support and vowed if elected to tighten state law so that a similar outcome couldn’t happen again.

“It is an extremely difficult set of circumstances. But we need to make certain that as a society, we are protecting life,” Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples said.

Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst, Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson and state Sen. Dan Patrick echoed similar sentiments after a Fort Worth hospital complied this weekend with an order to pull life-sustaining treatment for Marlise Munoz and her 23-week-old fetus.

“We need to clarify the law on this and permit this baby to be born,” Dewhurst said.

Stakes were higher in the first statewide televised debate in any race, but this foursome arrived well-rehearsed, if not a little road-weary.

Campaign aides said Monday’s debate, which was streamed live on CBSDFW.COM, marked at least the 24th debate or forum featuring all or most of the field. Many are hosted by local tea party groups — yet another was scheduled for Tuesday night in Salado, about 50 miles north of Austin — and follow a script of each candidate parsing otherwise identical conservative stances on border security, education and gun rights.

But for Monday’s living-room audiences in Austin, Houston, Dallas and the Rio Grande Valley, candidates were often knocked off their talking points. Patterson, for instance, broke from his challengers and left the door open for Texas legalizing medical marijuana.

“I’m not a doctor. But if there is medical efficacy for the use of tetrahydrocannabinol, and the doctor prescribes it, I don’t see nothing wrong with it,” Patterson said. “We’re talking about medicine. We’re not talking about recreational use.”

Afterward, Patrick was asked whether he thought there were no medical purposes for marijuana.

“I don’t have the answer to that,” Patrick said. “There’s no chance of that passing in the Texas Legislature.”

Patrick, who filed for bankruptcy in the 1980s, defended not repaying a six-figure debt even though the Houston conservative now has the financial means.

“The law of bankruptcy allows you to start with a clean slate,” Patrick said. “I followed the law. It’s very tough when you lose everything you have.”

The primary is March 4. Awaiting the winner in November is presumptive Democratic nominee Leticia Van de Putte, who emerged as a late challenger to take over the Senate chamber where she’s served for a decade.

(©2014 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

Latest News:

Top Trending:

View Comments
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 42,300 other followers