Local

Mayor Says DISD Is Putting City At A Disadvantage

View Comments
Galleries

cheer thumb Mayor Says DISD Is Putting City At A DisadvantageNFL Cheerleaders

cows Mayor Says DISD Is Putting City At A DisadvantageCowboys Cheerleaders

mavs dancers 4 10 10002570231 Mayor Says DISD Is Putting City At A Disadvantage

Mavs Dancers

victoria thumb Mayor Says DISD Is Putting City At A Disadvantage

Victoria's Secret Fashion Show

dfw Mayor Says DISD Is Putting City At A DisadvantageBest Young Athlete In DFW?

DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – It’s a battle of words. Mayor Mike Rawlings says the Dallas Independent School District is putting his city at a disadvantage.

As an example Rawlings points to companies like Toyota. This week, the automaker announced it is moving its U.S. headquarters to Plano instead of Dallas.

CBS 11 News takes a closer look at the growing battle between the mayor’s office and DISD.

She may be an obvious example for Mike Rawlings push for Home Rule. Alison Guerra chose Frisco over Dallas schools for her children. “We actually went into the schools and physically looked at the schools, met some of the teachers,” she said.

But the company that brought the Guerra family to North Texas, AT&T, chose Dallas. Guerra said, “Unfortunately for us his [husband] company didn’t make that choice.”

AT&Ts global headquarters sit in downtown. But Mayor Rawlings said not all companies make that decision and spoke about Toyota’s announced move to Collin County.

“The elephant in the room is we don’t get Toyota in Dallas because of the school system,” he said, adding that, “We talked to them.”

Toyota officials sent a statement to CBS 11 that read -

“We carefully evaluated a wide range of factors before selecting Plano. These included economic considerations, geography and climate, transportation, the cost of living and educational opportunities, among others.”

When speaking on Wednesday the Mayor wasn’t using the Toyota move as pushing points for Home Rule. “I wasn’t advocating… I’ve been advocating for us to have higher expectations for DISD.”

Southern Methodist University economist Mike Davis says businesses in fact do look at school systems. “It’s really hard to live in a place where you can’t consistently depend on the school system.”

Alison Guerra made her choice. But her family did so, despite the location of a company headquarters.

She and many other families believe school quality is issue number one.

(©2014 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

Latest News:

Top Trending:

View Comments