DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Working 9 to 5 – it used to be the way that millions of Americans made a living. But if Dolly Parton had recorded her famous tune today, she would have to shift the lyrics just a little bit. Working 9 to 7 – it’s not as catchy, but it is a reality for many employees, according to a new study.

The 9-to-5 job has become as outdated as the 1980 song and movie. According to a new report from the Center for American Progress, high level workers are increasingly being asked to put in longer work weeks.

Rachel Taylor stepped off of that track after having her baby. “It got to where, by the time I was coming home, it was already time to put her to bed,” the former principal said. In the old job, Taylor was putting in 50 or 60 hours each week.

Taylor quit her job at the end of the school year.

“That would’ve been hard to juggle it all. Although, a lot of people do it,” Taylor said. “For me, and for where we were at, we were able to take a step back.” However, not everyone can afford to step back right now, with the economy in its current state.

But the longer work week trend started before the economic crisis. Miguel Quinones with the SMU Cox School of Business explained, “We all carry around iPhones and we expect to buy things at any time. We expect to be given service at any time,” he said. This wired world, Quinones said, has helped lead to longer work weeks.

At the same time, Quinones said, there is also a trend in flex-schedules.

Either way, during a time of economic crisis, most workers are hanging on to whatever jobs they can get. “I think probably everybody is stepping up their game and wanting to be secure in their jobs,” Taylor said.