Update: Weber issued an apology Tuesday afternoon on Twitter for a tweet he sent out the night before comparing President Obama to Adolf Hilter.

His apology tweet links to his congressional website where he posted the following statement:

“I need to first apologize to all those offended by my tweet. It was not my intention to trivialize the Holocaust nor to compare the President to Adolf Hitler. The mention of Hitler was meant to represent the face of evil that still exists in the world today. I now realize that the use of Hitler invokes pain and emotional trauma for those affected by the atrocities of the Holocaust and victims of anti-Semitism and hate.

The terrorist attacks in Paris should remind us of the evil that still exists. Hitler was the face of evil, perpetrating genocide against six million Jews and millions of other victims. Today, we are facing the evil of Islamic extremists who are attempting to instill fear and murdering the lives of innocent people from Paris to Nigeria to Jerusalem and all over the world. The President’s actions or lack thereof is my point of contention. Islamic extremists have shown they are not going away, and instead are hungry for more blood.

After World War II, the world made a commitment to ‘Never Again’ allow terror free reign. As demonstrated by the Paris Peace Rally, we must all –Christians, Jews, Muslims, leaders around the world and those willing to fight for freedom – unite and stand strong together against radical extremism in any form.”

WASHINGTON (AP) – A Texas congressman drew criticism Tuesday for a tweet that used the world’s response to terrorist attacks in Paris as an opportunity to compare President Barack Obama to Adolf Hitler.

Rep. Randy Weber‘s official account, @TXRandy14, tweeted on Monday night: “Even Adolph Hitler thought it more important than Obama to get to Paris. (For all the wrong reasons.) Obama couldn’t do it for right reasons”

The tweet juxtaposes Hitler’s visit to the vanquished city after his troops invaded in World War II, and Obama’s failure to join dozens of world leaders at an anti-terror march through Paris on Sunday.

The White House has acknowledged that Obama or another high-level representative of the U.S. should have joined the march in unity with the French following attacks that left 17 people dead. The absence was widely noted, and heavily criticized by congressional Republicans.

“Rep. Weber’s tweet is vile and stoops to a new low level by desecrating the victims of the Holocaust to make a political point,” Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., said in a statement demanding an apology from Weber.

The Democrats’ campaign organization also was quick to denounce the conservative Republican and to connect the incident to Majority Whip Steve Scalise’s 2002 speech to a white supremacist group. Scalise has said he regrets the speech and didn’t understand the nature of the group.

“Congressional Republicans like Weber are clearly catering to the most extreme elements – first refusing to condemn Steve Scalise’s inexcusable affiliation with KKK members, and now this,” said Josh Schwerin, spokesman for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. “Speaker (John) Boehner and Republican leaders need to step forward and condemn Congressman Weber and his toxic brand of politics.”

Weber’s spokeswoman did not immediately return a request for comment or verification that Weber personally authored the tweet, which remained in his Twitter feed Tuesday.

Weber has a history of inflammatory remarks, and misspellings, on Twitter.

In a tweet last year he called Obama a “Socialistic dictator” and “Kommandant-In-Chef,” presumably meaning “chief.”
Monday’s tweet used “Adolph” instead of “Adolf” for Hitler’s first name.

(© Copyright 2015 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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