Barbara Dianis was dyslexic as a young child, she came from a family of educators and worked diligently to overcome her dyslexia. She wanted to help others who suffered from dyslexia overcome it. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s degree in education with a focus in special education Pre-K-12 and language learning disabilities from Oral Roberts University in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She also earned a master’s degree in Psychometrics, which is the study of testing and diagnosing cognitive abilities.

(Photo Courtesy of Barbara Dianis)

(Photo Courtesy of Barbara Dianis)

Dianis was and educational specialist at Trinity Christian Academy in Addison and later became the founder of Dianis Educational Systems, LLC that helps those with ADD, ADHD and learning differences. Part of Dianis’ work includes counseling parents, teaching them to assist their children in implementing effective learning techniques during homework and study time. One of Dianis’ clients was a boy in third grade that was told that he would have problems reading at grade level. Dianis worked with him and he is now about to graduate with a master’s in business administration.

Dianis has published three books. Her first book “Don’t Count Me Out!” is a guide to better grades and test scores Pre K-12, making winners out of struggling students, despite dyslexia, ADD/ADHD, or educational difficulties.

What would you tell someone who is considering returning to school to earn a master’s degree?

“Choose your area of passion, make sure that you implement a study plan that you adhere to every day, and pre-learn and pre-study before the class lectures. The lecture makes more sense when you know already what the instructor is going to talk about.”

What was the biggest challenge you faced when pursuing your master’s degree?

“All of the papers had I to write. I was in a very intense program and had to write an average of ten pages a day. I had to be very disciplined.”

What was the biggest reward for earning the master’s degree?

“The internal sense of satisfaction because I earned my graduate degree despite being told as a child that I would never go to college because of my dyslexia. It felt great to walk across the stage at graduation.”

Robin D. Everson is a native Chicagoan who resides in Dallas, Texas. Her appreciation for art, food, wine, people and places has helped her become a well-respected journalist. A life-long lover of education, Robin seeks to learn and enlighten others about culture. You can find her work at Examiner.com