Holly Fox is a judge and magistrate who serves in the jails and courts for the cities of Highland Village and Lewisville and the towns of Ponder and Little Elm. As a prosecutor, she serves in the court of the city of Corinth. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Baylor University and her law degree from Texas Tech University.  She also completed special agent training at the FBI academy and served as an agent in New York City.

(Photo Courtesy of Holly Fox)

(Photo Courtesy of Holly Fox)

Why did you pursue a higher degree?

“Upon graduation, I had no clue as to who I was, where I was going or what I wanted to be when I ‘grew up.’ I ventured back to my hometown of McAllen, Texas, where things were known, comfortable and going nowhere. It took three months of living at home and working at a local burger joint for $2 and change an hour plus tips to hasten a miraculous recovery from my folly. It was fear that catapulted me first and foremost: Fear of who I might become and fear of who I wouldn’t. Two years before college graduation, a seed for the pursuit of truth and justice had been planted within my soul while working an unpaid internship at a law firm. On my daily trips to the courthouse, what I remember most was the intriguing and almost mesmerizing time I spent sitting in a courtroom witnessing the criminal trial of a man who was accused of kidnapping, sexually assaulting and killing a man. Although my father had always encouraged me to go to law school because he said I liked to argue, that seed of interest set into motion a legal career that has lasted twenty-one years.”

What was the biggest challenge you faced when pursuing your degree(s)?

“I didn’t find motivation, determination or time management to be a problem within the confines of a rigorous scholastic schedule because I had learned to work hard and had developed healthy study habits. However, because I was paying for law school, financial strains and the need to maintain suitable yet flexible employment was a challenge. Finances, tuition, living expenses, financial aid, etc. put some undue stress and anxiety into the mix of things. Also, spending a significant amount of time with other aggressive law students engaging in petty, boring and psychological warfare was daunting. However, what I considered a challenge at the time, I now consider an asset.”

What was the biggest reward for earning the degree(s)?  

“It continues to afford me the ability, freedom and flexibility to earn a fruitful income while also raising a family. I have had the opportunity and privilege of working with people from considerably diverse backgrounds which has helped refine many virtues such as prudence, justice, truthfulness and temperance, as well as the theological virtues of faith, hope, mercy and charity. I am grateful for the choice I made many years ago.”

Robin D. Everson’s appreciation for art, food, wine, people, and places has helped her become a well-respected journalist. As a multi-faceted entrepreneur, Robin brings a unique look at the world of business through her many interviews and articles. A life-long lover of education, Robin seeks to learn and enlighten others about culture. You can find her work at Examiner.com