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DALLAS (CBS11) – Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins voiced his concerns in May. He’s still at it.

“Right now the right thing is to cut these rates,” Jenkins implores to no one specifically, but everyone broadly.

Jenkins has reached out to government leaders in several Dallas County cities, and leaders of area school districts, for one purpose: reduce tax rates, to soften the financial bill taxpayers will receive in the fall.

“The middle class didn’t get a 10 percent pay raise. They shouldn’t get a 10 percent tax increase”, said Jenkins.

Recent reports indicate property appraisals throughout North Texas have increased dramatically. The demand in Dallas’ housing market has spurred a spike in home values.

As a result, property tax obligations are expected to rise also.

Jenkins has called for a rate reduction on taxes, yet provide schools, hospitals and cities with an adequate taxing rate that keeps operations and services adequately funded.

“We’re not the problem,” emphasized Dallas County Commissioner John Wiley Price.

Price balked at a proposal to reduce the County’s tax rate. “We have one of the lowest tax rates in the state,” Price declared.

Jenkins has heard vocal support from Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings and some council members, but finance specialists with Dallas County school districts pushed aside talk of reducing tax rates.

Dallas ISD Chief Financial Officer Jim Terry said today property owners finance $1 billion for school operations, but rolling back a tax rate based on a projected windfall wouldn’t work.

“The state could alter its funding if we (Dallas ISD) reduced the rate,” Terry said.

Richardson ISD executives also said the school district would be penalized financially if officials rolled back tax rates that fund maintenance and operations of RISD campuses.

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