Follow CBSDFW.COM: Facebook | Twitter

FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – Police are growing frustrated as another day of searching has, so far, failed to find a missing woman.

Police said Typhenie Johnson was kidnapped Monday, her ex-boyfriend Christopher Revill is in jail for kidnapping.  Despite intense, coordinated efforts with volunteers she’s still missing.

On Friday, about 100 people — from police officers, people on horseback to some who took off of work just to help — searched the area near Sandy Lane Park in east Fort Worth.

“We don’t know what we are going to find. Part of me is, like, I don’t want to find her. But I do want to help. I know mom and the family are beside themselves. And being out here gives us, at least we are doing our part,” said a friend of the victim, Venus Ford.

They fanned out along the creek and into the fields around the Meadowbrook area. Search parties did the same about 15 miles north east near the apartment complex where Johnson was last seen. They searched not just for a body, but for any clues that might be tied to the case. Among the people looking are Johnson’s friends and a group of people who volunteer and train to help police at any time.

“It’s pretty rough woods out there. There are some snakes and things,” said volunteer and member of CERT Gerry Dalton.

CERT stands for Community Emergency Response Team. They recently reorganized the group in east Fort Worth.

They train initially to be prepared to help family and neighbors in an emergency. But extended training allows them to aid law enforcement when needed.

“It just so happens Tuesday night was our training night and we talked about and did grid of searches outside. So, it’s perfect timing,” Dalton said.

The environment these folks are operating in is very wet today and very thick with underbrush. So thick somebody could be a few feet from you and you cant even see them.

“It was tough,” said CERT volunteer Carla Sutera. “You know, the ground was very unsteady. We have a creek over here. it was really tough getting through.”

“What we are trying to do is stay in a straight line more or less so that you don’t miss anything between two people,” Dalton explained.

They look for freshly turned soil, clothing anything out of the ordinary.

“They have flags that they stick in because we don’t want to touch it because it possibly could be evidence,” Dalton said. “So we mark it. There’s a scribe that comes up behind them and write it down, where they are. Then we’ll go and have one of the officers look at it and see if it could be evidence.”

Sutera feels the work is important enough to not only take a day off work, but miss seeing her sister who is coming in from out of state.

“I was supposed to pick her up at the airport. I rented her car. She’s going to have to drive to my house so that I can be out here,” Sutera said.

“It’s very important to me,” she said. “I think that, I think that everybody deserves some resolution. So that’s why am out here.”

(©2016 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)