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DALLAS (CBS11) – A Dallas state lawmaker wants to treat deliberate attacks on police and other first responders as “hate crimes.”

Republican State Rep. Jason Villalba is trying to pass HB 429 into law.

(credit: @JasonVillalba)

(credit: @JasonVillalba)

The bill would elevate the charge a suspect is facing by one level.

“We’re talking about attacks against people based on one thing and that’s a status,” said Villalba.

Detective Ed Lujan is all too familiar with being targeted for having “blue blood” and a badge.

“I could feel euphoria of my life and soul leaving my body. So I knew I was dying,” said Lujan.

The Dallas officer was working an off-duty uniformed detail at the Kalua Discotheque back in November of 2015.

“The only thing that crossed my mind was to survive,” said Lujan.

Investigators said he was helping escort Eduardo Gonzalez-Rios out of the club after he allegedly caused a disturbance. Police said Gonzalez-Rios then jumped in his SUV and aimed right at Lujan.

“He completely ran me over and then deliberately ran me over two other times,” said Lujan.

The officer was dragged underneath for 50 yards.

“They teach you in the academy that you always go home,” said Lujan. “And that’s what I was thinking.”

Lujan broke his leg, ribs, nose, sternum and his head was scalped. Lujan also suffered a traumatic brain injury that still impacts him.

“We’re a target, I honestly believe that,” said Lujan.

That sentiment could not be more apparent then on July 7, 2016.

Five officers died, seven others were injured all because of their profession.

“We want to make sure that we show them that we have their back like they have ours,” said Villalba.

The legislator feels it will not cure all problems, but at least sends the right message.

Lujan hopes the bill becomes law and that it will change lives.

“At least if a bad guy thinks about assaulting an officer in any way he needs to have that in the back of his mind. Hey if I do this, I can go to jail for a long, long time,” said Lujan.

HB 429 was just referred to a committee for review and has support among many legislators.

Lujan’s case still has not gone to trial.