WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal environmental regulators have reached a long-awaited agreement with the owners of a polluted toxic waste site in Texas that was damaged during Hurricane Harvey, releasing dangerous chemicals into a river.

A home is surrounded by floodwater after torrential rains pounded Southeast Texas following Hurricane and Tropical Storm Harvey on August 31, 2017 near Orange, Texas. (credit: Scott Olson/Getty Images)

The Environmental Protection Agency says it reached agreement with International Paper Co. and McGinnes Industrial Maintenance Corp. to remove dioxin-contaminated materials from the San Jacinto River Waste Pits Superfund site in the Houston area.

READ MORE: Former Richardson Mayor And Developer Husband Found Guilty Of Bribery and Tax Evasion

The EPA says the estimated cost for the project is $115 million and is expected to take more than two years.

READ MORE: Collin County Says Candida Auris Fungus Responsible For 4 Deaths

The project includes removing 212,000 cubic yards of contaminated materials and creating infrastructure to contain remaining pollutants so they don’t spread beyond the site.

More than a dozen Superfund sites were flooded by Harvey.

MORE NEWS: 2 Teenaged Brothers Dead, Another Teen Injured After Shooting In Arlington

(© Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)