By MaryAnn Martinez

FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – Tutors employed by Texas Christian Univeristy are now being accused of providing forbidden material to students.

The latest allegation is coming from the attorney hired by the suspended students to get them back in class. TCU would neither confirm or deny that.

screen shot 2018 05 09 at 10 12 20 pm 12 TCU Students Suspended For Alleged Cheating; Tutors Now Accused By Students Attorney

TCU campus (CBS11)

A popular app called, Quizlet was allegedly used by students to view off-limits material. Senior Taylor Wirtz, who is not involved in the investigation at all, says almost everyone used the app.

“Basically it’s a website where you can make flash cards and online quizzes to help practice for tests so if you have notes or something you want to type up, you can put them on there.”

The university tells CBS11 a dozen students have been suspended.

TCU isn’t saying how long the alleged cheating went on or for what classes. The school says the students have the right to appeal the suspension, which they are doing. Some of the students hired a Fort Worth lawyer, Letty Martinez, who says students “located and studied previously posted materials readily available on Quizlet — not knowing these items would be on the exam.”

Martinez says some students were even directed to these materials by TCU employed tutors.

Wirtz says it’s completely possible the students may not have known what they were seeing on Quizlet.

“You don’t really know what you’re looking at when you’re looking on there, so it might just be someone’s notes and someone might be like oh I heard this was on a test.,” said Wirtz.

Martinez says “cheating” accusations stem from the professor’s belief that students should notify professors if they recognize exam questions. She is calling for TCU to update its policies and reverse the suspensions.

Here’s the full statement from Attorney Letty Martinez, of the law firm of Varghese Summersett. 

     We represent a number of TCU students who were recently suspended from the University on allegations of “academic misconduct” after using Quizlet — a public online study guide used by millions of students worldwide. While preparing for an exam, the students located and studied previously posted materials readily available on Quizlet — not knowing these items would be on the exam. Some students were even directed to these materials by TCU employed tutors. As it turned out, the professor responsible for the exam recycled test questions from past semesters. The “cheating” accusations stem from the professor’s belief that students should notify professors if they recognize exam questions. The knee-jerk suspensions have far-reaching and lasting implications for the students involved. The sanctions are being vigorously appealed.  In this modern day, it is incumbent for Universities to adapt to changes in technology and for professors to change their tests. It is our sincerest hope that after TCU officials review the cases in full, cooler heads will prevail and the sanctions will be reversed.

MaryAnn Martinez