NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Temperatures are really starting to heat up here in North Texas. Everyone knew the end of May would be hot, but not this hot! Remember, the extremely hot weather brings a number of health risks for anyone moving around outdoors.

Heat stress, heat fatigue, heat cramps and heat exhaustion are all forms of hyperthermia. It’s important to find ways to stay cool and know the signs of hyperthermia. In addition to feeling uncomfortably hot, you may also experience: dizziness, weakness, nausea, thirst or a headache.

No matter if you’re heading outside for a walk or jog or just running errands, experts say it’s best to wear light-colored, loose-fitting clothing, drink plenty of water and stay indoors when possible.

(credit: Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images)

In extreme heat, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature. Keeping your body hydrated and in a cool environment is the best way to avoid heat related illness.

Things are getting so hot that the City of Dallas issued its own Level 2 Heat Advisory, which is simply an alert that daytime temperatures are expected to be at or above 100 degrees with nighttime temperatures being above 80 degrees.

“Basically what we are doing is asking people to stay away from the heat if they don’t have to be out there,” explained Rocky Vaz, director of Dallas’ office of emergency management. “And if they have to be out there and they need some relief we have several city facilities that are open.”

The City of Dallas has also turned all libraries and parks and recreation centers into cooling centers, where the public is welcome to come and cool down.

First responders-with MedStar EMS in Fort Worth say they rushed to more than 30 heat-related emergencies during the Memorial Day weekend and it’s forecasted to be at or near 100 degrees for the next several days.

“Most commonly [we’re seeing] heat exhaustion. So, you’ve been outside, you’re sweating a lot and you’ve just become very fatigued,” MedStar spokesman Matt Zavadsky. “We do get very concerned because we’ve had several cases that have progressed to heat stroke, which is where the body has lost it’s ability to sweat, lost it’s ability to control the temperature and now these people have a really life threatening medical condition.”

If you aren’t used to exercising in the hot weather be careful. Experts with the American College of Sports Medicine say people who aren’t acclimated to the North Texas temperatures, or who get dehydrated, are at higher risk of suffering heat exhaustion.

Runner Thad Butcher said, “I try to get out every morning as early as possible, just so I can stay out of the heat. It’s not a lot of fun to run when it’s 100 degrees and or the heat index is over 100, so I try to get out early in the morning and enjoy as much as I can.”

To give North Texans some relief, the Salvation Army has opened a number of cooling stations across the meteroplex. Anyone wanting to escape the heat can stop by and cool off in an air conditioned facility.

The following cooling stations will be open seven days a week, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.

  • The Salvation Army Shelter
    5302 Harry Hines Blvd.
    Dallas, Texas 75235
  • The Salvation Army Shelter
    1855 E. Lancaster Avenue
    Fort Worth, Texas 76013

The following cooling stations will be open weekdays only, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

  • Cedar Crest (East Oak Cliff)
    1007 Hutchins Road
    Dallas, TX  75203
  • Denton
    1508 East McKinney St.
    Denton, TX  76201
  • Irving
    250 East Grauwyler Road
    Irving, TX  75061
  • McKinney
    600 Wilson Creek Pkwy.
    McKinney, TX  75069
  • Arlington
    712 W. Abram
    Arlington, TX  76013
  • Oak Cliff
    1617 W. Jefferson
    Dallas, TX  75208
  • Garland
    451 W. Ave D
    Garland, TX  75040
  • Lewisville – OPEN 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
    207 Elm Street
    Lewisville, TX  75067
  • Plano
    3528 E. 14th
    Plano, TX  75074
  • North Fort Worth
    3023 NW 24th St
    Fort Worth, TX 76106
  • Waxahachie
    620 Farley Street
    Waxahachie, TX 75165