LEWISVILLE, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) – With one more week to get out the vote, Governor Greg Abbott brought his reelection campaign to North Texas Monday.

“Our unemployment rate is at an all-time low, and the Texas GDP which is the way you measure our economy is the fastest growing economy in the entire United States of America,” Governor Abbott told a crowd in Lewisville.

The Governor said he wants to limit property tax increases and has pledged the state will spend more of its money to pay for public schools and rely less on property taxes.

One source of money he’d like to tap into is additional severance tax revenues coming from oil and gas production in the Permian Basin.

“It is an additional $1 billion per year. My recommendation to the legislature is we take that money and put that money into paying teachers more,” Abbott said.

screen shot 2018 10 29 at 6 08 36 pm Gov. Abbott Touts Low Unemployment In Campaign Stretch Run In North Texas

Gov. Greg Abbott campaigns in North Texas (CBS11)

While Texas Democrats have urged eliminating what they call a $5 billion loophole that allows large commercial property owners to sue county property appraisal districts so they can lower their tax bills, the Governor says it’s not that simple.

“The amount they’re claiming is highly overflated. It wouldn’t add up to $5 billion, and then on top of it, if these property owners who own these buildings, if their property taxes go up, they will be charging more to their tenants.”

Governor Abbott also campaigns hard for one of the top issues for Republican voters.

“I have put on the border more than 1,000 National Guard members to help secure our borders.”

Governor Abbott is traveling across Texas, including the DFW area, helping Republicans down-ballot to spread their message.

“This election is about far different visions for what the future of Texas looks like.”

The Governor hopes to help down ballot Republicans because he’s ahead of Democrat Lupe Valdez in the polls by 14 to 19 points.

Lupe Valdez Casts Her Ballot: ‘It’s Time For Change In Texas’