FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – Nearly 30,000 animals are making their way into the Fort Worth Stock Show Friday.

Many of the animals are born into it, therefore guests can expect to see new things at the show each year.

The animals make the show unique not only because of the variety of stock but because guests are also granted access to them.

People aren’t allowed to walk in and our of the barns, but they’re encouraged to get in there.

There’s a poultry barn, where the pigeons and chickens show Saturday. The stock also includes goats, longhorn cattle and dairy cattle.

Some of the horse stalls are filling up for the competitions and sales.

In past years, the shows had an old, dusty feeling in the ranch barn. Animals are staying elsewhere, now, after multi-million dollar renovations.

Some of the buildings on the ground have been there since the late 1940s, but the stock show and the city just finished the second part of a four phase renovation to modernize the facilities.

About 16 million dollars invested in wider aisles for livestock and people, better ventilation and less dust and smell in the air, new bathrooms and a new restaurant.

“Normally we put lights on our cattle when we have them in the stalls and I don’t have to now,” said Colby Threet. “So that’s one more thing I don’t have to do. It makes my job easier.”

The stock show said it spent almost $70 million in renovations.

With the Dickies Arena opening next winter, there are plans in place to expand some other areas of the show.

The new arena will have space for more than nine thousand people for rodeos. It will also have parking for more than two thousand cars.

The stock show can take space it has to use for parking this year, outside the Will rogers Arena, and do something with it. Instead of a parking lot next year, it will likely be a beer garden or a music stage.

“Stuff you may not think about when you first think of a stock show and rodeo, but it doesn’t mean we can’t offer new and other venues and entertainment options for our guests,” said Matt Brockman of the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo.

Some people admitted they’re a bit skeptical of the changes because they prefer the historic nature of the show; however, organizers emphasized they’re aware of the need to keep things feeling comfortable, while expanding.