DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – The Dallas mayoral race enters its second phase: the runoff between Democratic state Rep. Eric Johnson and councilman Scott Griggs.

Both have their sights set on Saturday, June 8 after emerging as the top two candidates in a crowded field of nine after Saturday’s voting.

Griggs and Johnson say they want to boost public safety, lure more businesses and jobs to the city of Dallas, and lower property taxes.

But they do have differences.

Griggs is focusing on his record around the horseshoe. “Leadership and experience at City Hall. I’ve been here for the people of the city of Dallas on municipal issues for many years helping them out with a proven track record of results,” he said.

Johnson, though, says he believes the council is divided. “I’m coming from the outside, I’ve not served on the city council and I’m hoping I can unify that council behind some big ideas for the city. Clearly, the council is not working together as efficiently as it can,” he said.

Griggs says as mayor he would focus on core city services and says Dallas has enough fancy projects. “For far too long in Dallas, we’ve focused too long on the postcard, building the fancy bridges, building the convention center hotel, a golf course, a horse park. We need to get back to the basics. Take care of police officers, our firefighters, first responders, taking care of our parks, streets, and rec centers,” he said.

Johnson says leading a city like Dallas is not as easy as that, and that he would offer a balance. “I don’t think it’s as simple as saying everything that’s not a pothole is a vanity project or everything that’s not fixing a street is a boondoggle. We need to have a certain amount of big dreams and big ideas but we also need to make sure the city works for its residents,” he said.

Aside from reaching out to voters and raising money, another step for both is to see who the other seven mayoral candidates and current mayor Mike Rawlings will endorse.

Another coveted prize is the backing from the Dallas Police Association, which represents more than four thousand active and retired officers.