DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – A Farmers Branch officer who shot and killed a vehicle theft suspect in Dallas has been indicted for murder by a grand jury.

Juan “Johnny” Moreno, 35, was fatally shot as he was pulling out of a Dallas parking lot on June 12. This prompted an outpouring of support by family and friends who believe he didn’t deserve to die.

Officer Michael Dunn, 43, turned himself in to the Seagoville Police Department on a charge of murder. He has since bonded out on an amount set at $150,000.

Farmers Branch Police Chief David Hale said Dunn is a 13-year veteran with the department.

Michael Dunn (credit: Seagoville Police Department)

Dallas police, who were in charge of the investigation as the incident happened in the city, said Farmers Branch officers were investigating a stolen vehicle report in the 11400 block of Emerald Street that evening.

According to police, as officers were trying to make the arrest, Moreno started to drive off. He was then shot and killed by an officer.

During the investigation, Dallas police investigators referred the case to the Dallas County Grand Jury, where the officer faced a criminal indictment.

The incident was captured on surveillance video. In the video that lasts about 23 seconds, a police cruiser is seen driving quickly into frame on the right. Soon after the cruiser stops an officer jumps out. A white pickup truck then starts driving past and away from the officer — all the while spilling debris from the open passenger side door.

“Justice was done. Like it’s supposed to be,” Juan Moreno Sr. said. “I’m glad that they did justice.”

Hale held a press conference Thursday morning in reaction to the murder charge given to Dunn. He said the department’s internal investigation is ongoing as it waits for more information from Dallas County’s criminal investigation.

“Many families are affected by this event and we pray that this process will ultimately bring closure to everyone involved,” Hale said.

When asked about his thoughts on the swift movement towards the indictment of Dunn, Hale said: “I think that anytime the criminal justice system can move quickly, I think it’s a good thing.”