Caroline Vandergriff | CBS 11 News


PLANO (CBSDFW.COM) — A fatal shooting at a house party in Plano has reignited the debate on allowing short-term rentals in residential neighborhoods.

The home where it happened is owned by a commercial company and was listed on several online rental sites. Some neighbors are now calling on the City of Plano to take action.

There have been similar movements in other North Texas cities.

“Short-term rentals are poison for residential neighborhoods, make no mistake,” said Dave Schwarte, who formed a coalition to fight to the growing trend after he found out five homes in his Arlington neighborhood were listed on short-term rental sites. “Owned by commercial renters. They don’t live there, they’ve never lived there. They rent it out for parties on the weekend.”

Schwarte says the shooting in Plano is just the latest example of the problems short-term rentals bring.

The home is owned by A-1 Commercial and Residential, Inc. Its president appears to manage several other short-term rentals in the DFW region.

Some neighbors have concerns about noise and safety at the home. They plan to join forces to get the Plano City Council to address the issue.

The City of Plano doesn’t have any ordinances governing short-term rentals.

“As these things spread, the horrors they spread will also increase, and I think you’re going to see further demands for city councils to step up,” Schwarte said.

Arlington City Council passed new regulations earlier this year, while cities like Southlake and Hurst have put outright bans on short-term rentals. Grapevine’s ordinance is currently facing a lawsuit.

Short-term rental operators in Dallas are required to register their properties online and to pay hotel occupancy taxes to the city each month.

In Fort Worth, short-term rentals are not allowed in residential neighborhoods. They can only operate in areas that already have a blend of housing and business.