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NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) – We are expecting winter weather to enter into North Texas overnight into Wednesday morning from the west.

Our western counties are under a WINTER STORM WARNING.

This is where a combination of sleet and snow could pile up on the roads as temperatures fall below freezing overnight. As much as 2 to 3 inches could end up on the roads making for hazardous travel conditions.

For the western half of the Metroplex there is a WINTER ADVISORY.

For the Metroplex it looks like Parker, Johnson, Tarrant, Wise and Denton counties will be most affected with Dallas, Collin and Ellis Counties getting a glancing blow.

We’ll like wake up Wednesday morning with rain and sleet falling.

Temperatures will just be at freezing by morning so we suspect it’ll be the bridges and overpasses that start to see some of this sleet build up on the surfaces.

We could see an icy accumulation on grassy areas and some untreated bridges and overpasses, it could go as deep as an ½.”

Most of this precipitation will fall in the morning hours.

By Wednesday afternoon it will taper off to just light snow over the Metroplex.

We could have some of this accumulate on the ground and windshields.

Temperatures will stay in the mid-30s across the afternoon with mostly cloudy skies.

There will be some melting and clearing of the roads thanks to this meager warming and strong winds but anything that stays on the roads overnight will freeze as lows fall toward the mid-20s.

This will be the coldest night so far this 2020.

Snow total prediction

That means black ice is likely for the Thursday morning in spots that didn’t dry or water drained onto the roadways. This ice won’t last long Thursday morning as highs are expected to get into the upper-40s along with sunshine.

Keep checking in here at CBSDFW.COM or on our Weather App.

Since the highest impacts from this winter storm are just a few counties west from the heart of the Metroplex, any small changes to this forecast could produce significant problems for a large segment of our population.