WASHINGTON (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — Texas Senator Ted Cruz is under self-quarantine after learning he was in contact with a man who tested positive for the novel coronavirus.

Cruz and Rep. Paul Gosar both interacted with the man at the Conservative Political Action Conference in Maryland nearly two weeks ago.

Cruz said Sunday he would spend the next few days at his home in Texas until a full 14 days had passed since their interaction. He said his interaction with the man consisted of a “brief conversation and a handshake.”

Cruz said he has since consulted with medical authorities from the Houston Health Department, the Harris County Public Health Department, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Department of Health and Human Services as well as his personal physician.

“I’m not experiencing any symptoms, and I feel fine and healthy,” Cruz said. “Given that the interaction was 10 days ago, that the average incubation period is 5-6 days, that the interaction was for less than a minute, and that I have no current symptoms, the medical authorities have advised me that the odds of transmission from the other individual to me were extremely low.”

Gosar, R-Ariz., said he had made contact with the man at CPAC and that he and three members of his senior staff were under self-quarantine. His office will be closed for the week, Gosar said in a tweet Sunday.

Besides Cruz and Gosar, the CPAC schedule listed three other senators and 12 House members who were scheduled to speak. They included No. 2 House GOP leader Steve Scalise of Louisiana, No. 3 Republican leader Liz Cheney of Wyoming and congressman Mark Meadows of North Carolina, who has since become the White House chief of staff. Also on the schedule was Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao, the wife of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Cheney has been told by CPAC that she was not exposed to the convention attendee who has tested positive for the coronavirus, a Cheney spokesman said.

Both President Donald Trump and Vice President Mike Pence spoke at CPAC, but the White House said there was no indication that either had met or were in “close proximity” to the infected attendee.

David Popp, spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said Sunday evening that no changes had been made in the chamber’s schedule in the wake of Cruz’s decision to remain in Texas. McConnell had spoken with Cruz, Popp said.

The Senate has a vote scheduled Monday evening and plans to be in session this week considering energy and possibly other legislation. The Senate and the House are set for a one-week recess the week of March 16.

(© Copyright 2020 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)