DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Dallas County experienced a record number of new positive cases on Tuesday as well as a record number of deaths from coronavirus.

Dallas County Health and Human Services reported 257 additional positive cases of COVID-19 and 16 additional deaths.

That brings the total case count in Dallas County to 10,719, including 245 deaths.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins released the following statement on the new information:

“Today we experienced a record number of new positive cases as well as a record number of deaths. We’ve seen a trend upward from well below 200 at the beginning of last week to the mid-200s this week in new cases. Unfortunately, we have not seen any decline in the metrics of ICU admissions, hospitalizations for COVID-19, ER visits for COVID-19 symptoms, and deaths that the CDC and the local health experts are tracking to determine when it’s safe to loosen restrictions on activities. It is wise for everyone to focus not on what is legal, but rather on what is safe. Avoid large crowds, maintain 6 foot distancing when outside the home and wear a cloth face covering to protect yourself and as a sign of respect and protection for your fellow person when on public transportation or in businesses, plus use good and frequent hygiene.

I have implemented a curfew at Dallas County buildings outside of any city’s curfew zone of 8:30 at night. This allows for peaceful protests at a government location until a little bit before sundown, and then gives people the opportunity to return to their cars before it gets dark. I want to say this to our peaceful protestors: I’m committed to protecting your right to protest, but I’m also committed to your public health. To the extent possible, please find ways to maintain 6 foot social distancing, wear a face covering when in crowds, and recognize that from a public health perspective, it is dangerous and not advisable to participate in large gatherings. Having said that, you have a constitutional right, and Governor Abbott’s Open Texas documents allow for those gatherings, and we will ensure your safety on County property should you choose to protest.

We must listen to one another. I don’t learn by talking and I doubt anyone else does either. We learn by listening with respect. We must find a way to forge a new normal for policing and violence against black residents, and also a new normal for the way that we interact with one another during this time of COVID-19 until a vaccine is found. Texans are strongest when they stand together. We are a big diverse state with many different people and many different ideas but we are a welcoming state, and a people who seek justice and know that there can be no true peace without justice. May we all come together in a spirit of mutual respect and radically transform the way we police and the way we perceive one another.”

Thirteen of the 16 patients who died lived in Dallas.

The most recent COVID-19 deaths include:

-A man in his 40s who had been critically ill in an area hospital. He had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 50s who had been critically ill in an area hospital. He had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 50s who had been critically ill in an area hospital. He had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 60s who had been critically ill in an area hospital. He did not have underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 60s who had been hospitalized, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 60s who was a resident of a long-term care facility. He had been hospitalized, and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 60s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A woman in her 60s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A woman in her 70s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.

-A woman in her 70s from Duncanville. She had been critically ill in an area hospital, and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 70s who had been hospitalized, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A woman in her 80’s who was a resident of the City of Dallas. She had been critically ill in an area hospital.

-A man in his 80s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in Lancaster. He had been hospitalized, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A woman in her 80s who had been hospitalized, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 90s who was a resident of a long-term care facility in Mesquite. He expired in the facility, and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.

-A man in his 100s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and did not have underlying high risk health conditions.