DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Dallas County Health and Human Services reported Tuesday 306 additional positive cases of COVID-19, bringing the total case count in Dallas County to 14,843.

DCHHS also reported eight more deaths, bringing the total 293.

Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins released the following statement:

“Today we announced the death of eight people who lost their battle with COVID-19, ranging from a person in their 30s to people in their 90s. I’ve also sent a letter today asking the Governor to consider requiring masking. There is increased evidence that wearing a mask is the single most important thing we can do to protect the spread of COVID-19. Several medical papers have come out and are coming out indicating this finding. In fact, countries where masking is common have been the ones that have seen the most rapid return to the new normal. I’m hopeful that the Governor will either lead on this issue or allow the local governments to lead so that we can require masks in businesses and outside the home. This would of course be done with as soft of an enforcement as possible and without the possibility of jail time. In the meantime, regardless of whether leadership from elected officials happens, it is imperative that you all lead in your homes and in your lives by making good personal responsibility decisions. This means avoiding large crowds, wearing a cloth face covering when around others, maintaining six foot distancing, plus using good hand hygiene. It’s up to all of us to #FlattenTheCurve #StayHomeSaveLives #WearAMask.”

The newly reported deaths include:

A Dallas man in his 30s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

A Hutchins man in his 40s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

A Dallas woman in her 40s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

A Dallas man in his 60s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

A Dallas man in his 60s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

A Dallas woman in her 70s who had been critically ill in an area hospital, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

A Dallas woman in her 90s who was a resident of a long-term care facility. She died in the facility, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

A Dallas woman in her 90s who was a resident of a long-term care facility. She expired in the facility, and had underlying high risk health conditions.

Of cases requiring hospitalization who reported employment, more than 80% have been critical infrastructure workers, with a broad range of affected occupational sectors, including: healthcare, transportation, food and agriculture, public works, finance, communications, clergy, first responders and other essential functions.

Of cases requiring hospitalization, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age, and about half do not have any high-risk chronic health conditions. Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

The age-adjusted rates of confirmed COVID-19 cases in non-hospitalized patients have been highest among Hispanics (667.4 per 100,000), Asians (187.4 per 100,000) and Blacks (136.4 per 100,000). These rates have been higher than Whites (43.8 per 100,000). Over 60% of overall COVID-19 cases to date have been Hispanic.

Of the 293 total deaths reported to date, more than one-third have been associated with long-term care facilities.