By Nicole Nielsen

(CBSDFW.COM) – If you haven’t heard of vaccine “waste lists,” you probably will soon.

It’s the way many ineligible North Texans are jumping the COVID-19 vaccine line and are getting their shots early.

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To make sure all vaccine doses are being placed in someone’s arm, some pharmacies, like specific Walmart and CVS locations, are offering “waste lists” to join.

It’s so they have someone to call to come get a vaccine when there are canceled appointments or no shows.

Not every pharmacy or location has them. To check, you can go to the website of each pharmacy to see if they’re vaccinating. If they are, you can call and ask if they have a list for “waste.”

If they do, you could be placed on a call list for a vaccine.

Some locations may require you to be able to come within 30 minutes of the call. Each operate differently.

Jon Battle runs the DFW Covid Vaccine Finder Facebook page with over 26,000 members.

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He says he’s seen hundreds from his page that are successfully getting the vaccine through “waste lists.”

“People are looking for short cuts,” Battle said. “The waste lists, also known as extra doses… these started up when the pharmacies came on board. Every little provider has their own method and their own way of doing a waste list.”

Debbie Villagomez and her husband both recently secured shots this way.

“We put our name on four or five lists I believe, and we got a call within 2 days, and we booked it!” Villagomez said.

Battle also says he’s seen people have success getting a shot if they show up in person around closing time and ask if there’s extra.

Of course, it’s important to note he says the way lists are handled may change.

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“It may change from day to day, one day they may say we are picking names… the next, we are taking walk ins…. its not standardized yet,” Battle said. “I think come this summer, all of these challenges we are having will be ironed out.”

Nicole Nielsen