Best DFW Gift Shops For Mother’s Day

April 28, 2015 7:00 AM

Photo Credit Thinkstock

Photo Credit Thinkstock

Photo Credit Thinkstock

Photo Credit Thinkstock

While flowers, chocolate and dinner reservations are great gifts for Mother’s Day, today’s Mothers lead busy lives and have a multitude of interests. What better way to shop for a Mother’s Day gift than a place that has the items that Mom really wants?

The Wild Detectives
314 W. 8th St.
Dallas, TX 75208
(214) 942-0108
www.thewilddetectives.comCurling up with a chai latte, a croissant and her favorite mystery book might be just the time out that mother would enjoy. Oak Cliff’s The Wild Detectives is a bookstore and café that might be quickly over-looked as the storefront is a bungalow in the charming south Dallas neighborhood. If it is lunch or dinnertime then perhaps she could order a veggie sandwich of zucchini, oyster mushroom, and mojo picon on seeded rye. Other options include a charcuterie board and Spanish wines or locally brewed beers would best satisfy the literati as she dives into a book of poetry or fiction. Untranslated Spanish literature along with other cultural finds are amongst the treasures at The Wild Detectives.

We Are 1976
1902 Henderson Ave.
Dallas, TX 75206
(214) 821-1976
www.weare1976.comA little bit of this and some of that is what you will find at We Are 1976. Along with unframed prints, no-animal-harmed animal head mounts, stationery, cool coffee cups and all kinds of fun stuff here. Located on the main strip of coolness on Henderson Avenue, We Are 1976 is the place to go for something different for Mother’s Day gifts.

The Store In Lake Highlands
10233 E. Northwest Hwy., Ste. 410
Dallas, TX 75238
(214) 553-8850
www.thestoreinlh.comThe Store in Lake Highlands is a small town boutique in a big city. Tyler candles, Caren and Farmhouse Fresh lotions, Valerie Allen jewelry, scarves of silk and color, a large selection of Happy Everything ceramic serveware by Coton Colors and free gift-wrapping makes this of the best kept secret in east Dallas.

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Enchanted Forest
6619 E. Lancaster Ave.
Fort Worth, TX 76112
(817) 446-8385
www.enchantedforesttx.comFort Worth is the home of the oldest and largest metaphysical shop in the metroplex. Since 1991, the Enchanted Forest has everything for the mystic lover. Religious plaques, books, tarot card decks, jewelry made by local artists, essential oils, incense, bulk dried herbs like chamomile and lavender flowers, rare rocks and minerals makes up this 5,500 square foot store. Mother can enjoy an hour-long deep tissue or Swedish massage from the licensed massage therapist on staff in a peaceful therapy room complete with six Himalayan salt lamps and soft relaxing music.

Nicholson-Hardie
5725 W. Lovers Lane
Dallas, TX 75209
(214) 357-4348
www.nicholson-hardie.comA family-run business since 1899, Nicholson-Hardie is a garden and gift boutique that is a Dallas fixture. Brothers Josh and Michael Bracken have carried on their parents’ tradition of offering unique items and expert advice. The store carries the glitzy, glamorous Olivia Riegel picture frames, Lady Primrose line of personal care products, Agraria candles and diffusers, clothing items like tunics, robes and scarves are part of the selection at Nicholson-Hardie. They carry the Le Cadeaux line of melamine serving pieces that are great for outdoor parties. Vietri Italian pottery, beautiful blue and white china jars, garden seats and vase reproductions are part of the indoor and outdoor collection of the store. Nicholson-Hardie is well known for its seeds, succulents and herbs. People flock to the store for their phalaenopsis orchids and hydrangeas. Nicholson-Hardie could be considered a candy store for the home and garden lover.

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Robin D. Everson is a native Chicagoan who resides in Dallas, Texas. Her appreciation for art, food, wine, people and places has helped her become a well-respected journalist. A life-long lover of education, Robin seeks to learn and enlighten others about culture. You can find her work at Examiner.com