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Expert: Beat Wrinkles By Rolling Over

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U.S. Treasury Secretary John Snow listens to Democratic criticism of the 2006 federal budget as he appears before the Senate Finance Committee on Capitol Hill on February 8, 2005 in Washington, D.C. (credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

U.S. Treasury Secretary John Snow listens to Democratic criticism of the 2006 federal budget as he appears before the Senate Finance Committee on Capitol Hill on February 8, 2005 in Washington, D.C. (credit: Win McNamee/Getty Images)

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DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – For some, wrinkles begin with too much exposure to the sun. Other times it’s just genetics, and there’s not much humans can do about that. However, new research shows that some wrinkles are quite preventable: Just don’t sleep on your stomach.

Upon waking, most people have ‘bed crinkles’ from their pillow case. But experts say that, over time, those lines can turn into permanent wrinkles. A pillow wrinkle bothered 23-year-old Courtney Little so much that she’s already tried Botox.

“I just felt like it really stuck out to people,” she said. “It was just an insecurity of mine.”

Dermatologist Dr. Doris Day said the best way to avoid pillow wrinkles is to sleep on your back.

“Sleeping on your stomach, on your side when your face is being pushed in that same position over and over can create a problem,” Day said.

She said most people, however, tend to sleep in the same position their mothers placed them in as children. Breaking that habit can be nearly impossible.

“Unfortunately, we tend to stay sleeping in the positions that we were placed in when we were young,” she said, recommending that those worried about wrinkles invest in a good pillowcase with a high thread count.

And according to a Swedish study, sleep deprivation shows on the face, and other people can easily see it.

“You tend to have more of a droop and you don’t hold your face up as well as when you’re rested,” Day said. “You’re not animated in the same way.”

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