Colt McCoy’s Wife Causes Stir On Radio

By Tom Fornelli, CBS Sports

(CBS SPORTS) – While Ohio State may be the current center of the NCAA violations universe, the wife of former Texas quarterback Colt McCoy may have caused some problems for Texas on Tuesday afternoon. Rachel McCoy called into Colin Cowherd’s show on ESPN Radio on Tuesday and then started talking about Texas football players being offered things for free while in Austin. Thankfully, SB Nation was kind enough to transcribe the key parts for us.

People in Texas are just being friendly and they don’t mean anything by it at all. They don’t realize most of the time it is a violation. Texas is very clear with their players … You cannot expect 19- to 20-year-old men to not accept free stuff while they’re in college … There’s no way that college kids can really, honestly say no to all this stuff … It’s hard for a lot of these guys to even know … I saw so many of his teammates who maybe didn’t have some of that self-control to be able to say no to somebody. It’s hard because you’ve got adults who you respect who you think will know what’s right and what’s wrong … You do what adults say; that’s how you’re taught. So you have adults offering things, promising the world, doing all this stuff: we’re taught to go along with that. That’s the respectful thing to do. It’s interesting to see adults really putting kids in these positions where they’re taught to agree and go along and respect.”

Now that excerpt is far from Rachel McCoy’s words in their entirety. After listening to the entire conversation I’m of the opinion that there really isn’t much here. While McCoy talks about people in Austin offering things to Texas players, she never actually says that any of her husband’s teammates accepted anything. She just talks about how hard it would be for kids to say no to such minor things like free dinners.

So while some people may try to make more out of what McCoy said about Texas football, I’m rather confident that nothing she described during her radio appearance doesn’t take place on college campuses everyday throughout the country. It’s certainly nothing that I think the NCAA needs to worry about, as they’ve got some bigger fish to fry at the moment.

Comments

One Comment

  1. Mykl says:

    Dear Tom, you need to clarify …you write this: While McCoy talks about people in Austin offering things to Texas players, she never actually says that any of her husband’s teammates accepted anything. She says this: “I saw so many of his teammates who maybe didn’t have some of that self-control to be able to say no to somebody.” Clearly she’s stating she knows of players accepting something…maybe??

  2. Robert says:

    “I’m rather confident that nothing she described during her radio appearance doesn’t take place on college campuses everyday throughout the country. It’s certainly nothing that I think the NCAA needs to worry about, as they’ve got some bigger fish to fry at the moment.”

    Exactly! Why would the NCAA waste time on a school like Texas, or Ohio State (for that matter) when we all know those exact types of things take place on college campuses everyday throughout the country. I’m not even sure anything at Ohio State has officially been properly investigated and determined to be an NCAA violation yet anyway. I know a lot of people are talking about stuff, but you know how that goes. I guess at this time all we know is that a group of student athletes sold/traded some of their own possessions. I think the known value for everything sold/traded by all the named players over the years under investigation was somewhere around $10,000.00 total. That is what the NCAA has on Ohio State so far. Oh ya, an e-mail didn’t get forwarded. Tell me no other student athlete or school has ever done those types of things.

    I am not sure what you mean by “bigger fish to fry” though. Is there some reason to believe that some player (or player’s family members) got paid hundreds of thousands of dollars from an agent or booster or something? I mean, players who do that sort of stuff are the ones doing the damage. That seems like a legit issue as opposed to some athletes selling a few things they own over a few years time (for not much money) and a coach not forwarding an e-mail he got about it.

    Maybe you mean the NCAA should be frying bigger fish like players involved in crime, particularly “violent crime”?? If so, I agree. Not garage sales and ebay sales and e-mails about garage sales and ebay sales and stupid stuff like that. Every school has athletes that sell stuff and get stuff and the like. All of them.

  3. Dr. Sarcasm says:

    Sounds like Colt’s mare needs to be reined in.

  4. Elmer says:

    If they are such “kids” they should not be allowed to vote.

Comments are closed.

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