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Jobs In Dallas Health Care Have A Healthy Outlook

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(Credit: Thinkstock)

(Credit: Thinkstock)

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The only way an industrialized nation can grow is by having a healthy workforce, and keeping people healthy and looking for ways to increase the quality and longevity of their lives is paramount to a country’s growth.

According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, the outlook for employment in the health care sector is healthy and strong.

The health care and social assistance sectors are expected to increase by 5.6 million jobs from 2010 through 2020, with nursing increasing by 712,000 jobs and home health aides by 706,000 jobs nationally.

The largest occupation within the health care field belongs to registered nurses. Currently there are over 2.5 million registered nurses in the United States. Aside from doctors and dentists, pharmacists were noted as having the highest annual salary within the health care field ($104,260).

Even radiologic technologists and technicians will see an employment need to 30,000 over the same period. Medical and public health social workers, medical records and health information technicians, radiologic technologists and patient transport workers are positions that are also seeing growth.

In the Dallas/Fort Worth/Arlington area, the average annual employment for 2008 in the health care sector was 234,591 and total private sector employment in health care in 2008 was 2,552,684. This represents 9.19 percent of the total private-sector employment for the area.

People from other states are seeing the job opportunities and are moving to North Texas to take advantage of them.

Kelly Robinson, who was born in London, England and raised in St. Petersburg, Florida, attended a private nursing school in Florida and moved to Dallas “because there are more job opportunities for nurses to make more money.”

“All of my nursing instructors told me that if I was going to move anywhere, it should be Texas for all the opportunities for growth. There is a real need for nurses here,” said Robinson.

With community colleges across the nation producing more than 50 percent of the new nurses and other health care workers, educational needs are being analyzed to meet these workforce demands. That demand calls for advanced degrees in medical and hospital administration as well.

A job in health care, just might be what the doctor ordered.

Robin D. Everson is a native Chicagoan who resides in Dallas, Texas. Her appreciation for art, food, wine, people and places has helped her become a well-respected journalist. A life-long lover of education, Robin seeks to learn and
enlighten others about culture. You can find her work at Examiner.com

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