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What To Do With Exide Waste In Frisco?

(credit: KTVT/KTXA) Brian New
Brian joined the CBS 11 News team in 2013 after working a...
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FRISCO (CBSDFW.COM) - The Exide battery recycling plant in Frisco has been shut down for a year. But some Frisco residents said that the fight is not yet over. The issue is what to do with the waste from the plant — bury it or remove it.

Meghan Green, who lives just a couple of miles away from the shutdown plant, said that she would like to see the waste removed from the site and hauled off to a licensed hazardous waste landfill. “It’s a black eye for the city,” she said. “There are studies out there that show the economic impact that living in a city with a landfill does.”

The city estimates that hauling the waste to another site would cost nearly $135 million, and they are unlikely to receive that much money from Exide in bankruptcy court. However, Frisco Mayor Maher Maso explained that cost is not the main factor. “Making sure our residents are protected,” he said, “that is the driving factor.”

While Maso said that no final decision has been made on what to do with the waste, sources told CBS 11 News that the city will most likely support burying the waste in a sealed landfill on site. The landfill would be constantly monitored to ensure that none of the hazardous materials seep from the contained area. This plan would cost an estimated $20 million, and many argue that it would be just as safe as hauling it away.

The deadline for the city to file a claim against Exide in bankruptcy court is Tuesday.

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