CBS 11 Header TXA 21 Header MeTV Header KRLD Header The Fan Header
Severe Thunderstorm Watch: Fannin County until 7:00pm Grayson, Collin, Delta, Hopkins, Kaufman & Rains counties until 10:00 pm  | Radar | Current Conditions | Storm Team Blog

Best Of Home

Places To Hear Classical Music In DFW

June 24, 2013 5:00 AM

View Comments
(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

(Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)

Classical music is revered in many cultures as one of the truest forms of music out there. The quality and melodies that accompany classical music is soothing to many, and still widely thought of as part of an elitist status. That view has changed somewhat. Classical music is now seen as mentally stimulating, emotionally stirring and spiritually inspiring to the point that popular music artists are incorporating and imitating the oldest form of music into their new pieces. Look no further than this list of places to get your classical music fix.

The Dallas Symphony Orchestra
Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center
2301 Flora St.
Dallas, TX 75201
(214) 692-0203
www.dallassymphony.com

The Dallas Symphony Orchestra (DSO) has been the premier location for serious classical musical lovers for over 113 years. Currently under the musical direction of Jaap Van Zweden, locals and visitors alike can enjoy classical music performed at a modern concert hall – the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center. DSO has grown its audience by offering a variety of series platforms:

Classical features stirring violins and piano concertos, Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony, Berlioz’s “Summer Nights,” Mahler’s Fourth Symphony and Stravinsky’s ballet “The Firebird.”

Pops features an evening of pieces by George Gershwin, music from Alfred Hitchcock movies and tunes of the Cotton Club big-band era including Cab Calloway, Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington.

Family features the works of Berlioz, Mussorgsky, John Williams and Andrew Lloyd Webber for Halloween, traditional Christmas music classics and an interactive “Play Your Own Instrument” concert where children get to make their own instrument and play with the symphony.

Not sure you want to invest in a series or do you prefer to pick and choose? You can purchase individual tickets to the various DSO performances.

The Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra
The Bass Performance Hall
526 Commerce St.
Fort Worth, TX 76102
(817) 665-6000
www.fwsymphony.org

The Fort Worth Symphony Orchestra (FWSO) has been enriching audiences since 1912. FWSO performs out of a classic European-styled facility – The Bass Performance Hall. FWSO offers classical, pops and specialty series to meet the desires of the community. Its upcoming season under the direction of Peruvian conductor Miguel Harth-Bedoya will feature performances of Yo-Yo Ma, Strauss’ “Suite from Der Rosenkavalier;” Prokofiev’s Symphony No. 7 and Violin Concerto No. 2, Mendelssohn’s “Elijah” and American Film Institute’s No. 1 Greatest Movie Musical “Singing in the Rain.”

The Plano Symphony Orchestra
The Eisemann Center
2351 Performance Drive
Richardson, TX 75082
(972) 473-7262
www.planosymphony.org

Hector Guzman is the musical director of the Plano Symphony Orchestra (PSO). The PSO was developed in 1983 and serves the North Texas communities of Plano, Frisco, Lewisville and Wylie with its outreach programs for elementary school children.  The PSO has grown from three concerts per year to over 25 concerts per year. It will open its new season on September 21, 2013 with the 2009 Gold Medal-winner of the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition Haochen Zhang. This will be the orchestra’s first performance of Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 6. Tchaikovsky’s Francesca da Rimini will start the performance. Broadway Songs and Stories, featuring five-time Grammy Award-winner Sandi Patty, the Canadian Brass ensemble as well as concerts featuring Vivaldi, Sarasate, Piazzolla, Tsoy and Beethoven are also part of the upcoming season.

Related: Most Community-Centered Bookstores In DFW

The Richardson Symphony Orchestra
The Eisemann Center
2351 Performance Drive
Richardson, TX 75082
(972) 234-4195
www.richardsonsymphony.org

The Richardson Symphony Orchestra serves the northern metroplex with Clay Couturiaux as the music director and conductor. All of RSO’s performances take place at The Charles W. Eisemann Center for the Performing Arts. Its 52nd season opens with guest pianist Chu-Fang Haung performing Rachmaninoff’s Second Piano Concerto. Other orchestral showpieces to be performed include Prokofiev’s Romeo and Juliet Suite No. 2 and Dmitry Kabalevsky’s Overture to Colas Breugnon, Op. 24.

The Garland Symphony Orchestra
Granville Arts Center
300 N. 5th St.
Garland, TX 75040
(972) 926-0611
www.garlandsymphony.org

Under the musical direction of Robert Carter Austin, The Garland Symphony Orchestra (GSO) serves the Garland, Dallas, Richardson, Rowlett, Rockwall and Sachse communities with 93 professional musicians. The GSO has been in existence since 1978 and each year expands its repertoire. This upcoming season includes Stravinsky’s “Petrushka,” Copland’s “Rodeo,” Rachmaninoff’s “Symphonic Dances,” Dvorak’s “Slavonic Dances” and Bartok’s “Dance Suite.” The GSO performs at the Granville Arts Center in downtown Garland at the corner of Fifth and Austin Streets.

The Mesquite Symphony Orchestra
Mesquite Arts Center
1527 N. Galloway Ave.
Mesquite, TX 75149
(972) 329-9453
www.mesquitesymphony.org

The Mesquite Symphony Orchestra (MSO), in its 27th season, serves the Mesquite community and the outlying areas by bringing classic music like Tchaikovsky’s Piano Concerto No. 1 and Howard Hanson’s Symphony No. 2, The Romantic to its audience. Roger Gilliam has been the musical director of the Mesquite Symphony Orchestra (MSO) since 1993.

Related: Best Local Theater Directors In DFW

Robin D. Everson is a native Chicagoan who resides in Dallas, Texas. Her
appreciation for art, food, wine, people and places has helped her become a well-
respected journalist. A life-long lover of education, Robin seeks to learn and
enlighten others about culture. You can find her work at Examiner.com

View Comments
blog comments powered by Disqus