Psychology is a broad field of study but psychologists are used in a variety of business settings.

Listed as one of the fastest growing occupations in the country according to the U.S. Department of Labor, Statistics Bureau of Labor Statistics, Industrial/Organizational psychologists analyze the workplace, provide feedback on a needs assessment of the workplace, conduct research, identify weaknesses within an organization, design instructional training courses to increase productivity and a myriad of other tasks to help companies reach their goals and employees feel valued for their contributions to the work place. I/O Psychologists also look at interpersonal relationships in the workplace, workplace environments and organizational policies.

READ MORE: Governor Abbott Proposes Parental Bill of Rights As Part of Re-Election Campaign 

A master’s degree is required to become an industrial/organizational psychologist and there are many rewards.

Financially, industrial/occupational psychologists earn between $21.43 and upward of $80.00 per hour. This equates to 44,570 to $166,400 annual salary according to the U.S. Department of Labor, Statistics Bureau of Labor Statistics.

READ MORE: Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton Refuses To Hand Over January 6 Records

The rewards gleaned from working as an industrial/organizational psychologist are more than financial.  Working for companies that produce products and services that move the country forward is one of the numerous personal satisfaction rewards that can come from being an industrial/organizational psychologist.

Mireya Mata had always been interested in human behavior and earned a Bachelor’s of Arts degree in psychology. She knew she couldn’t get a job with just a bachelor’s degree. She felt that in order to get a job, the practical thing that would fit her needs would be to earn a master’s degree. Her graduate school adviser helped her get placed in her first job as a research scientist for a small defense contractor.

“I learned a lot. I didn’t have any experience. It was fun to learn so much. I traveled with a three-star general to 14 different countries. I got to live in Germany while working for Hughes Training, which was owned by General Motors. By living in another country, I learned to have confidence in myself. Education is never a wasted effort. You learn in the classroom, but you also learn about yourself and that is valuable,” said Mata.

MORE NEWS: Dallas ISD: A Lot Involved In Keeping Doors Open During COVID-19 Surge

Robin D. Everson is a native Chicagoan who resides in Dallas, Texas. Her appreciation for art, food, wine, people and places has helped her become a well-respected journalist. A life-long lover of education, Robin seeks to learn and enlighten others about culture. You can find her work at Examiner.com