By Ginger Allen

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DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Amazon said that its Prime Day was as big as it hoped. The online retailer said that, at peak times, it sold faster than it did last Black Friday.

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The highly advertised sale was almost like a sporting event — Prime Day vs. Black Friday. Consumer gurus acted as commentators, keeping score throughout the day.

Most of the time, consumer experts told the I-Team that the match between the two big shopping days appeared to be a tie, with Prime a bust on some items but a victory for most electronics.

Most everyone agreed that it was a win-win for consumers. “Amazon is big enough that they can invent a shopping day like this,” said Professor Lar Perner of the USC Marshall School of Business.

Amazon caused several other retailers to react, adding up to big savings for those looking for a deal.

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Bloomingdales kicked off the day with “prime time” specials. Macy’s sent out what it called a “surprise” giving shoppers free shipping all day long on all orders for the first time ever.

Walmart countered with perhaps the biggest reaction, claiming to slash prices on more than 2,000 of its slashed prices called rollbacks. Best Buy, JCPenney, Old Navy, Gap and Target also advertised new markdowns.

But Amazon’s big day took a beating on some social media sites, where shoppers called it “underwhelming,” “a clearance sale for old items” and “more like ‘buy the crap you don’t need’ day.”

The best advice was to act quickly if you found something you wanted. Quantities were limited. And be aware the buzz surrounding the big day had the site moving much slower than usual.

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The I-Team reached out to several local clothing, furniture and grocery stores, and none of them were reacting with similar sales. Many said that this seemed to be an online event — one that the experts we talked to said could be back next year.