By Ken Molestina


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ARLINGTON (CBSDFW.COM) – A 12th hole collapse on Sunday ended all chances of Jordan Spieth winning the Masters and claiming another green jacket.

“I just didn’t have those iron swings as it showed,” said Spieth, who admitted his concentration and game was off. His performance proves even the best can have a meltdown.

Senior Director of Behavioral Health at Texas Health Resources, Ross Teemant said the kind of pressure that caused Spieth to crack is present anytime someone is forced to perform. “Anytime you are in a crunch situation there is going to be anxiety,” said Teemant. He added that anxiety doesn’t discriminate based on profession. “It could be the CEO of a company or somebody flipping burgers in the back of a fast food restaurant.”

According to Teemant the same anxiety that can cause someone to shine is the same that can cause someone to crash. “Sometimes that anxiety gets in our head and those thoughts drive us downward if we start questioning our own competence or ability,” said Teemant.

He suggests the following things one can do to minimize stressors and cut back on anxiety.

First, he suggests people learn to trust their strengths and rely on them without outside influences. “Sometimes that anxiety gets in our head and those thoughts drive us downward if we start questioning our own competence or ability,” said Teement.

And in the end he said even people with the best skills and abilities are still human; never perfect. Keeping that in mind is useful in bouncing back from a pressure-induced collapse.

“Just saying ‘hey this is something that happens as part of performance’ and just go on to the next thing,” advised Teement.

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