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DALLAS (KRLD) – A North Texas native has designed a clothing line to encourage women who make their careers in the science, technology, engineering, and math fields.

Lizzie Cochran is the founder of Dallas based Epidemia Designs. It’s a line of workout clothes printed with digitally magnified images of heart, brain and nerve cells. The three collections are called She’s Got Heart, She’s Got Brains, and She’s Got Nerve.

Heart (Epidemia Designs)

Heart (Epidemia Designs)

“What we tried to do is straddle the line between making the patterns look pleasing, but also making it so anyone with a science background would recognize the images,” Cochran says.

Cochran is now in medical school at UT Southwestern, but got the idea for Epidemia Designs during an undergrad biology class in New York.

Nerve (Epidemia Designs)

Nerve (Epidemia Designs)

“We spent time looking at cells under microscopes and identifying them, and I started to realize how strangely beautiful they are,” Cochran says. “You magnify them enough and they look like an interesting pattern. I started thinking it would be cool to use them as prints.”

Brain (Epidemia Designs)

Brain (Epidemia Designs)

Epidemia Designs launched online in July, after a yearlong Kickstarter campaign provided the startup money. Cochran says they’re still getting the word out, but the concept has received a lot of interest.

“Growing up, I always knew I was interested in medicine but I was also an artsy girlie girl, and it took me awhile to reconcile those parts of my personality,” Cochran says. “I can have a achieving medical career but still wear skirts and flowers in my hair. I want other women in STEM to realize they don’t have to sacrifice any part of their identity.”

Epidemia Designs is also charitable, donating a portion of its proceeds to Dallas-based nonprofit Girlstart. They provide summer camps and workshops for young girls interested in the sciences.

“I love them because they don’t do a ‘pink razor’ version of science,” Cochran says. “They acknowledge that girls are as curious and smart as boys, and that there’s no need to put a princess costume on anything.”

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