By Robbie Owens


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LITTLE ELM (CBS11) – In a community like Little Elm, the first on-duty death of police officer is a personal. The community is mourning like they have lost one of their own, because they have.

“He literally, changed my life,” said Eric Lewis, Jr., of Little Elm.

Two years ago, Lewis was headed down the wrong path. Until God, he said, made Detective Jerry Walker a roadblock in blue.

Det. Jerry Walker (credit: Little Elm Police Department)

“The one-on-one talking that we had that whole day, it was like meant to be,” said Lewis. “Almost like God put me in that position, in that spot to meet Detective Walker, to put me on a better path than what I was going down.”

Eric Lewis, Jr. and Eric Lewis, Sr. talk about Detective Jerry Walker (CBS11)

Eric Lewis, Jr. and Eric Lewis, Sr. talk about Detective Jerry Walker (CBS11)

Despite having supportive parents, Lewis admits he began running with the wrong crowd—and just going with the flow—because it was easier than swimming against the current.

Detective Walker’s ‘tough love’ was just what he needed.

“There were times that I would be so discouraged,” recalled Lewis. “He always gave me good advice, he always said I could call him, he was a really good person.”

The detective also formed close bonds with his family. Eric Lewis, Sr., said they were all stunned and began immediately praying when they heard that an officer had been wounded.

“But, when we first heard that it was Detective Walker? That just pieced you to the soul, because we know him,” added the Senior Lewis. “He rides this neighborhood every day.”

According to Eric Lewis, Sr., the detective built strong ties in the community by always reminding residents that he was a part of their community.

“He was the kind of officer that, if the kids are outside playing basketball, he will get out and play with them. He was a good one… one of the best.”

And the family’s connection with Detective Walker wasn’t the first time that a Little Elm officer had proven to be an ally, rather an adversary.

“I was thinking about committing suicide,” admitted Lewis, Jr., right up there on 380. He came and he saw. He jumped out the car and he grabbed me back and he stopped me. That’s what officers here do. They don’t judge you on your skin color, they judge you on what you’re doing.”

“I believe he didn’t take that job because he needed a paycheck, he had a heart for the people and he wanted to help people. It’s like losing a friend,” said Lewis, Jr.

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