UPDATE: ‘Leaning Tower Of Dallas’ Drawing Crowds With Camera Phones: ‘We Had To Come Get A Picture With It’

DALLAS, Texas (CBSDFW.COM) — The high rise office building set for implosion in Uptown Dallas Sunday morning refused to come down.

Part of the 11-story tower is still standing at a slight angle at the corner North Central Expressway and Haskell Avenue, despite multiple efforts to knock it over.

“The leaning tower of Dallas, there you go,” said D.W. Lewis, who drove by to see the unique sight.

The area around what’s left of the building is now fenced off, with Dallas police officers keeping the site secure.

A spokesperson for Lloyd D. Nabors Demolition said the remaining structure poses no threat to surrounding buildings or pedestrians.

The building was imploded around 7:45 a.m. this morning.

WATCH: Implosion Fails To Take Down Uptown Dallas Office Building

 

“You could see the building fall down and then that tower there just kind of stopped,” said Ed McAndrew, who came out to watch the implosion. “Everybody went, ‘Oh no,’ And there it is. It’s still sitting there. Amazing.”

A high-reach excavator brought in after the implosion still couldn’t finish the job.

“As with many demolitions, the core and elevator shafts require additional demolition measures, and we will proceed with conventional demolition efforts over the course of the week utilizing a crane and wrecking ball,” said a Lloyd D. Nabors Demolition spokesperson.

The site will eventually become part of a new 27-acre mixed use development with high-rise residential and office space, hotels, restaurants, a park and entertainment.

“We feel like we’re transforming into the next chapter,” said Artemio De La Vega, CEO of De La Vega Capital, the company in charge of the massive project. “It’s like a rebirth. The size of the project and the location is phenomenal. We’re centrally located, which is where the name ‘The Central’ comes from.”

But nothing can be built until the newly-dubbed “leaning tower of Dallas” finally falls.

“I’m sure that they’ll finish the job and get it done,” Lewis said. “It’s just one of those things.”

The new development is expected to be completed in four or five years. Construction has already begun.