NORTH TEXAS (CBSDFW.COM) – When people hear the name Pat Green, most rightly associate it with Texas country music. But what many people may not know is that Green is also an artist — and not just of the musical variety.

Fort Worth’s Galleywinter Gallery — where Green and a handful of other local artists create and sell their art — is not only something to see, it’s a Texas Treasure.

Many people already know that Pat Green is a Waco area native, a Texas Tech grad, and a three-time Grammy nominee. But about a decade ago, Green discovered that his creative abilities go far beyond a microphone and a guitar. It started with sketching during his downtime, but then a meeting with friend and celebrated sculptor Gil Bruvel changed his world.

Gil Bruvel (L) and Pat Green (R). (credit: Galleywinter Gallery)

“I can tell you the moment it happened,” says Green. “I can tell you precisely the moment. I was with my friend, Gil, and I asked the same question, ‘How do you do that?’ And he rolled up a ball of clay and he handed it to me and said, ‘Make a rabbit’.”

And that was the start of Green’s love affair with the visual arts — particularly sculpting. But don’t think it all came easily. The creative vision was there, but it required a lot of study and hard work.

“My (sculpted bronze) horses are really specific, and you can tell we spent some time learning the anatomy of a horse to get all the bones right, and the muscles right. But I have some human figures that are weird-looking things,” laughs Green, “And they’re just more expressive.”

After years of working and creating from his Fort Worth home, Green began to see the need to open a gallery.

“It got to the point where we had enough of my art in my house, where my wife said, ‘You need to sell this, because we can’t have you everywhere,'” he joked.

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So about two years ago, the Galleywinter Gallery was born. If the name rings a bell, it’s because Green has a song called Galleywinter, which was itself inspired by the farm in Bosqueville where Green grew up.

The gallery, located just off Vickery south of the Cultural District, is a working studio run by Green and a handful of other artists: Ginger Walker, Cheryl Hodge, and — more recently– his sister, Leslie Jandrain, and his nephew, Cade Kegerreis.

It might be a little unusual to have a workspace in the same area they display and sell their art, but Green says it serves a purpose beyond convenience.

“I think when people can see that you’re working and see what you’re doing at the present, then they become part of the narrative– part of the story,” says Green. “And that’s how you get them in, and involved, and interested.”

But from a practical standpoint, Green understands that no matter how much his projects may call to him, his music has to come first.

“The truth is I pay my bills with my music and that’s a brilliant gift from God — but yeah, there are times I’m irritated I have to leave something that I’m really in a stride with.”

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So how did selling his first piece of art rank among the top moments of his life?

“Any sale of art is wonderful because you’ve touched somebody,” says Green. “But I think the more fun thing for me was when I saw my first piece go from clay into bronze. That’s when I really started thinking, ‘Man, I can do it, and this is real!'”

He says he’s grateful to be able to work in an environment with so many gifted artists, and for the creative outlet the gallery provides.

But when it comes to his long-term goals, he’s a lot more pragmatic.

“I don’t know how other art dealers feel, but I just want to keep the doors open and the lights on,” says Green, laughing. “I think that’s the biggest goal I have.”

The Galleywinter Gallery is open Wednesdays only, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., or you can contact them to set up a private appointment.