DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Dreamers in North Texas are calling Thursday’s U.S. Supreme Court decision a victory, but say there’s still more work to be done.

The high court upheld the program that protects immigrants who were brought to the country as children and allows them to work.

Justices ruled 5-4 the Trump administration ​attempted to end the program ​improperly.​

Edwin Romero of Dallas said he has been following all of the updates closely.

​He left Mexico ​​when he was 6 years old with his mother and siblings to come to the U.S.

“I went to school here. I graduated from Skyline High School,” he said. “Then I went to the University of Texas at Dallas in Richardson.”

Edwin Romero (credit: Edwin Romero)

In 2013, Romero received DACA protection and went on to ​become a paralegal. ​

“I am extremely proud of everything I’ve been able to accomplish here in the U.S. I definitely thank my mother for the sacrifices that she made to bring us here to this country no matter how she did it ,because I know that she did with the intent to have a better life and a better future,” he said.

Romero now uses his skills to advocate for his community.

He said he has no plans ​to return to Mexico, but​ said when the Trump​ administration announced ​it was terminating DACA in 2017, he felt great anxiety.

“For the past three years we’ve been living in great uncertainty, just every day wondering what’s going to happen.”

On Thursday a weight was lifted off his shoulders. ​

“It’s a breath of fresh air and it gives us hope,” he said.

But not everyone agrees with the decision, ncluding Paul Chabot, the ​president of Conservative Move, which helps families and businesses moved to conservative areas of the county.

“DACA encourages further illegal ​immigration into this nation ​our borders are still many ​are still flowing over into this nation,” said Chabot.​

“Like many people have said we celebrate today but we fight tomorrow,” said Romero. “What we fight for is a permanent solution. It’s very important for our communities, those that are able to and that have that right to register to vote, to vote in these elections.”

Erin Jones