DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Dallas County Health and Human Services reported 331 new confirmed positive COVID-19 cases on Monday, bringing the total confirmed cases in Dallas County to 90,318.

No additional deaths have been reported Monday.

There are 51 additional probable case reported Monday for a total of 4,631 probable cases including 13 probable deaths.

Of the 331 new confirmed cases, 263 came through the Texas Department of State Health Services’ electronic laboratory reporting system and nine are from previous months.

“We’re seeing an increase in COVID-19 cases in our hospitals and in positive testing and now is a critical time for us to get the numbers going back in the right direction,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins in a statement. “We know what we need to do, we just need to do it. Wear your mask and avoid crowds. Maintain six-foot distancing and use good hand-washing practices. It’s up to all of us to flatten the curve and the best way to do that is to follow the advice of doctors that can be found here.”

Texas Reports Most Coronavirus Hospitalizations In Nearly 2 Months

The provisional 7-day average daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 41 was 453, an increase from the previous daily average of 383 for CDC week 40.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 has increased to 12.6% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 41 (week ending 10/10/20).

A provisional total of 390 confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases were diagnosed in school-aged children (5 to 17 years) during CDC week 41, an increase of 32% from the previous week in this age group.

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age.

Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 24% have been associated with long-term care facilities.

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