DALLAS (CBSDFW.COM) – Dallas County Health and Human Services reported 1,269 additional positive cases of COVID-19 on Friday, Nov. 6.

That number  includes 867 confirmed cases and 402 probable cases.

There is a cumulative total of 100,628 confirmed cases (PCR test), including 1,127 confirmed deaths.

There is a cumulative total of 8,003 probable cases (antigen test), including 18 probable deaths.

Two additional deaths were reported Friday which include a Dallas woman in her 50s and a Dallas man in his 60s.

Both had underlying high risk health conditions.

“Today we’ve reached the grim milestone of 100,000 Dallas County residents who have been sickened with COVID-19. Our daily numbers continue to increase with today’s total of 1,269 being the highest daily total we’ve seen since our peaks in July that could not be attributed to a backlog or data release like we saw earlier this week when 80% of our probable cases on the day that we reported 1500 cases were attributable to antigen tests that had been done over the last 15 days. Today’s numbers are from recent cases,” said Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins in a statement.

The provisional seven-day average of daily new confirmed and probable cases (by date of test collection) for CDC week 43 has increased to 733 — the highest daily average of new cases since July.

The percentage of respiratory specimens testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 has increased to 15.4% of symptomatic patients presenting to area hospitals testing positive in week 43 (week ending 10/24/20).

A provisional total of 693 confirmed and probable COVID-19 cases were diagnosed in school-aged children (5 to 17 years) during CDC week 43 – over twice the numbers of children diagnosed in this age group 3 weeks earlier (CDC week ending 10/3/2020).

“We are seeing too many people relax their resolve due to COVID fatigue and now is not the time to stop wearing masks or being around more people when we are in a dangerous fall wave,” Judge Jenkins added. “We must get these numbers under control as Thanksgiving and Christmas are the two holidays when people are around more people and the cold winter months bring us indoors where spread is easier. We know what to do, we just need to do it. Wear your mask, avoid crowds, and renew your focus on moving from our understandable selfish desires to resume our pre-COVID activities to sacrifice for the community health and economy for a little while longer. This won’t last forever but unfortunately it will last a little while longer and it’s up to all of us to do our part to flatten the curve.”

Of all confirmed cases requiring hospitalization to date, more than two-thirds have been under 65 years of age.

Diabetes has been an underlying high-risk health condition reported in about a third of all hospitalized patients with COVID-19.

Of the total confirmed deaths reported to date, about 24% have been associated with long-term care facilities.

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