ACAPULCO, Mexico (CBSDFW.COM/CNN) — A powerful earthquake struck near the Pacific city of Acapulco during the night on September 7, killing at least one person and causing buildings to rock and sway in Mexico City — more than 200 miles away.

The U.S. Geological Survey said the quake had a preliminary magnitude of 7 and was centered about 10 miles northeast of Acapulco.

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Guerrero state Gov. Hector Astudillo told Milenio Television late Tuesday night that one person had been killed by a falling post in the town of Coyuca de Benitez near Acapulco.

View of damaged cars outside a hotel after an earthquake in Acapulco, Guerrero state, Mexico on September 7, 2021. (credit: Francisco Robles/AFP via Getty Images)

In Mexico City, alarms sounded just before the ground started shaking. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration initially issued a tsunami warning, but later called it off.

Astudillo said the tsunami alert center had not registered any variations in the sea level. The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center later said the threat of potential waves had passed.

The mayor of Acapulco, Adela Román, said in statement that “there is no really serious situation” so far and no reports of casualties.

“There are nervous breakdowns; people are worried because there have been aftershocks,” she said, adding that there are “many gas leaks in many places” as well as some landslides and fallen walls.

Before the first death was reported, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador said via Twitter that authorities in the four states that most felt the earthquake told him there were no victims or serious damage beyond some collapsed walls and falling rocks.

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“Fortunately there is not serious damage,” he said.

Mexico’s National Civil Defense said it was conducting reviews in 10 states, but had not received reports of victims nor serious damage.

In Mexico City, nearly 200 miles away, the ground shook for nearly a minute in some parts of the capital, but the quake was less evident in other parts. Some people evacuated their buildings briefly, but most quickly went back inside on a rainy night.

Medical staff move patients out of a hospital after an earthquake in Mexico on Sept. 7, 2021. (credit: Sunny Quintero/Xinhua via Getty Images)

Mexico City authorities said there were no early reports of significant damage in the city, though electricity was knocked out in some neighborhoods. Some broken windows in a downtown high rise covered the sidewalk in glass.

Arturo Hernández stood outside the relatively new apartment building he moved into just three years ago. Beside it stood a taller building abandoned since the magnitude-7.1 earthquake of Sept. 19, 2017, in neighboring Puebla state that caused major damage in the capital.

Tuesday’s earthquake occurred four years to the day after a magnitude-8.2 earthquake that struck off the coast of Mexico’s southern state of Chiapas, largely destroying the town of Juchitan in neighboring Oaxaca state and killing dozens.

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(© Copyright 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

CBSDFW.com Staff