WASHINGTON (CBSDFW.COM/AP) — It was a unanimous Supreme Court decision on Monday, but not on the issue many had thought. Justices rejected a claim that the Memphis, Tennessee, area has been taking water that belongs to Mississippi from an underground aquifer.

The high court’s first decision of the term came in a case argued in October, deflating expectations that the justices would resolve the issue of whether Texas’ ban on most abortions could be challenged in federal court.

READ MORE: Texas Ban On Mask Mandates In Public Schools Is Back In Place

SB 8, the law in question, bars abortions after the detection of a fetal heartbeat at around six weeks — often before a woman knows she is pregnant — and is in stark contrast to Roe v. Wade, the 1973 landmark decision legalizing abortion nationwide prior to viability, which can occur at around 24 weeks of pregnancy.

Two cases on the Texas issue were argued November 1 under an accelerated process that the court has previously used only rarely and in some of its most notable decisions, including the Bush v. Gore case that settled the 2000 presidential election.

But those cases remain unsettled.

READ MORE: Texas Is Officially Tesla's New Home

Instead, Chief Justice John Roberts wrote for the court in an interstate water dispute that reaches back to 2005.

The Supreme Court has long embraced the concept of a fair share in state fights over rivers and streams, a legal doctrine known as equitable apportionment.

Mississippi, though, “contends that it has sovereign ownership of all groundwater beneath its surface, so equitable apportionment ought not apply. We see things differently,” Roberts wrote.

Although the water source at issue in this case is water from hundreds of feet below the surface, Roberts wrote that “we see no basis for a different result.”

MORE NEWS: Plano 6th Grader Says Classmate Used Heimlich Maneuver To Save Him From Choking

(© Copyright 2021 CBS Broadcasting Inc. All Rights Reserved. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

CBSDFW.com Staff